Teaching Academy

The Teaching Academy is composed of University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty members and instructional staff. We provide leadership to strengthen undergraduate, graduate, and outreach teaching and learning at UW Madison.

News

2014 UW Teaching Academy New Member Induction Ceremony on April 24th at Wisconsin Idea Room

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Teaching Academy is proud to announce the induction of 16 new members for 2014, 7 Fellows and 9 Future Faculty Partners (FFPs).  The induction ceremony is to be held on April 24th 2014 at 4:30 pm in the Education Building.

Teaching Academy Fellows and FFP's come from departments all across campus, and are admitted to the Academy based on their DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE IN teaching and on the recommendations from fellow faculty and students.

The new 2014 Teaching Academy Fellows include: Casey E. Gallimore, Pharmacy; Young Mie Kim, Journalism and Mass Communication; Shirin Malekpour, Mathematics; Rebecca Muehrer, Nursing; Mitchell J. Nathan, Educational Psychology; Sarah K.A. Pfatteicher, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences; and Lyn Van Swol, Communication Arts.

The new 2014 Teaching Academy Future Faculty Partners include: Elizabeth Barr, Communication Arts; Diana Becker, Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education; Jessica Clayton, Political Science; Molly Harris, Classics; Miranda Kolb, Communication Arts; Amanda Margolis, Pharmacy; Melissa Miller, Slavic Languages and Literatures; Arman Pazouki, Mechanical Engineering; and Katherine Robiadek, Political Science.

We also would also like to express our great gratitude to all the nominators of the new Fellows and FFPs: John Martin, Connie Kraus, Greg Downey, Margaret Nellis, Andrea Arenas, Leslie Smith, Sarah Miller, Elizabeth Rice, Michael Xenos, Jenny Higgins, Dan Negrut, Cheryl Hanley-Maxwell, Nils Ringe, Yoshiko M. Herrera, Anna Tumarkin, Lyn Van Swol, and Patricia A. Rosenmeyer.

 

Notice to Academy Fellows about impending vote on proposed amendments to by-laws

The Teaching Academy Executive Committee invites you to vote on proposed amendments to by-laws of the Academy at the 2014 Induction Ceremony on April 24, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. in the Wisconsin Idea Room of the Education Building located at 1000 Bascom Mall. 

The goal is to clarify the by-laws and improve the efficiency of our operations and streamline our procedures. We are amending the by-laws as the current version required standing committees and annual events that did not allow the Academy to adapt nimbly and flexibly to changing conditions on campus, and the procedures and language were vague in several places. The current and proposed by-laws are attached below.

 

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Teaching Academy Summer Institute 2014 Call for Proposals

Dear Colleagues,

Interested in Teaching and Learning? Need time to reflect on your teaching? Need time to develop or restructure a course or program sequence? Want to interact with others passionate about higher education?

We have just the thing for you and your colleagues.

The UW Teaching Academy is happy to announce the 14th annual Summer Teaching Institute! The institute will be held from June 2 - June 5 at the UW Arboretum. This year's theme is The Four I’s of Teaching: Intend-Inspire-Innovate-Invest and it is assured to be a stimulating, restorative event.

If you are interested or know of someone who is, please visit our webpage for more information: <https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/summer-institute> and apply by April 26.

We are looking forward to your joining us for yet another great TA Summer Institute!

Debra Shapiro & Tom DuBois

Co-Chairs of the Teaching Academy Summer Institute

 

Teaching Academy 2014 Call for Nominations

The UW-Madison Teaching Academy announces its annual Call for Nominations for faculty/staff Fellows or graduate/professional student or postdoctoral Future Faculty Partners. Nominees should have (1) demonstrated teaching excellence and (2) a willingness to be active participants in Academy events and governance. Fellows require a minimum of three years of teaching service at UW-Madison, whereas FFPs require three semesters of teaching experience (broadly construed) at UW-Madison. 

Nominees should be committed to promoting excellence in teaching and to participating in the Teaching Academy. For more details and nomination packages, please visit https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/becoming-fellows (for Fellows) or http://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/becoming-ffp (for FFPs). The Induction Ceremony for new Fellows and Future Faculty Partners takes place in April 2014. Nomination deadline is extended to March 31, 2014.
 

Teaching Academy 2014 Winter Retreat Press Release

RELATE: Rethinking Effective Learning and Teaching Engagement

 Why Does the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Matter?

The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) is the process of asking ‘what should I do to enhance learning in the long-term?’ It matters because this inquiring mindset helps instructors rethink the meaning and value of their teaching to promote effective, long-lasting learning in higher education.

This is the message the 2014 UW-Teaching Academy Winter Retreat shared among its 123 participants from across campus on Friday, January 17th in Union South.

Dr. Beth Martin, Teaching Academy Co-Chair, kicked off the event with a succinct and inspirational introduction to the Teaching Academy. Dr. John Karl Scholz, Dean of the College of Letters & Science, started the program with an energetic welcome talk. Dean Scholz remarked that our graduates have a long tradition of serving in the Peace Corps as well as leading Fortune 500 companies.  He then challenged the audience to consider teaching practices that are proven to be effective and that promote the Wisconsin Experience – where students apply their learning inside and outside of the classroom.  He encouraged us to embrace the Essential Learning Outcomes (http://www.learning.wisc.edu/welo2010.pdf) and encouraged us all to embrace teaching as the vital dissemination of scholarship. He also committed L&S the largest unit at UW-Madison to support undergraduate career initiatives.

Dr. Anthony Ciccone, Director of the Center for Instruction and Professional Development at the UW-Milwaukee, gave a keynote on Learning matters: reflections on SoTL and the value of inquiry. According to Dr. Ciccone, learning matters because we inquire into not only what learning is, but more important, what learning is for, to both students and instructors. Dr. Ciccone quoted Kreber (2008), that “success is defined by students not only as learning lots about a subject, but knowing how they learned it and why what they learned matters to their understanding and interaction with the world around them”. Seeing learning and teaching this way asks us to consider how students grow in their learning and how we, as instructors, grow in our effectiveness. Dr. Ciccone also encouraged us to consider a threshold concept: in addition to metrics of our own performance such as student evaluations, and metrics of student performance (what percent of the material did they recall), we must look at the longer-term learning outcomes (what did the students learn and how long was it retained?). Finally Dr. Ciccone endorsed the UW Teaching Academy’s efforts when he quoted Shulman (1999) on the spirit of teaching academies

“…as a combination of support structures and sanctuaries: places where faculty whose scholarly interests include teaching and learning can find safety and even colleagueship for doing good work.”  (Shulman 1999)

After the keynote, Dr. Sarah Miller, Associate Director of the Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program (MTLE, mtle.wisc.edu) moderated a panel on Rethinking effective teaching. The three panelists, Jenny Higgins from Gender & Women's Studies, Aurelie Rakotondrafara from Plant Pathology, and Stephen Young from Geography and International Studies, have all participated in the MTLE Program as early-career faculty. They each expressed their deep appreciation for the valuable learning-community that the MTLE program has successfully created for them, and the peer feedback and support that allowed them to integrate highly effective educational innovations into their courses.

The panel was followed by table discussions facilitated by Dr. Adrian Treves, the Teaching Academy Co-Chair. Attendants were asked to share a success and a failure they’ve had in improving their teaching or attempting innovation, as well as their experiences related to giving/receiving peer feedback. Dr. John Martin, Teaching Academy Communications Sub-committee Chair, shared a vision for the new Teaching Academy website as a proactive virtual learning community that will be open to all UW-Madison.

The Retreat ended with Vice-Provost for Teaching and Learning Dr. Chris Olsen’s talk on Food for thought/thought for food. Dr. Olsen encouraged us to think of teaching the way we think of our scholarship – we must look for evidence to evaluate if we are succeeding. He introduced more campus resources that instructors can avail themselves of in improving, reshaping, and promoting their effective teaching and learning.

Many attendants left the retreat with much food for thought. The Winter Retreat ignited a conversation on scholarship of teaching and learning in hopes of promoting further reflection by faculty on their own SoTL and the value of inquiry.

*Carolin Kreber (2008) The University and its Disciplines: Teaching and Learning Within and Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries. Routledge.

L.S. Shulman (1999) "Visions of the Possible: Models for Campus support of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning." Comments made at meetings during November and December, 1999, accessed January 25, 2014 at http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/elibrary/visions-possible-models-campus-support-scholarship-teaching-and-learning

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Retreat Organizing Committee:  Beth Martin (Co-Organizer), Adrian Treves (Co-Organizer), Chris Olsen, Ruth Olson, John Martin and Erica Halverson.

This event is co-sponsored by UW-Madison Teaching Academy, Vice-Provost Office for Teaching and Learning, Office of Professional & Instructional Development, Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program, and DoIT Academic Technology.

Teaching Academy 2014 Winter Retreat on January 17: Rethinking Effective Learning and Teaching Engagement (RELATE)

To Register: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6sAFc9yL6jfnIQ5

Tentative program is available at: https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/teaching-academy-2014-winter-retreat

 

RELATE: Rethinking Effective Learning and Teaching Engagement

Campus conversation is building around engaging and improving effective teaching on campus, and the Teaching Academy invites you to be a part of the conversation!

Join us for our annual winter retreat:

  • Friday, January 17, 2014
  • 8:30am – 12:30pm
  • Varsity Hall II, Union South
  • Keynote Presenter: Dr. Anthony Ciccone, Director, Center for Instructional and Professional Development, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Over the course of the morning, we will RELATE our successes and failures around improving teaching, and discuss learning, reshaping and promoting effective teaching on campus.

Retreat activities include:

  •  Keynote address by Dr. Anthony Ciccone, Director of the Center for Instruction and Professional Development, UW-Milwaukee: “Learning Matters: Reflections on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and the Value of Inquiry”;
  •  Panel discussion by recent UW-Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence (MTLE) Program fellows who will describe their learning community;
  •  Small group discussion among attendees to strengthen our learning community and move toward collaborative improvement.

The retreat is open to the whole UW-Madison community, and we hope you'll be part of the conversation. Continental breakfast, coffee and boxed lunches will be provided. More information will be posted soon. Space is limited to 120, so register soon!

To register: https://uwmadison.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6sAFc9yL6jfnIQ5 

This event is co-sponsored by UW-Madison Teaching Academy, Vice-Provost Office for Teaching and Learning, Office of Professional & Instructional Development, Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program, and DoIT Academic Technology.

Teaching Academy 2013 Fall Kickoff Press Release

Please note video clip and presentation slides are available here: https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/uw-teaching-academy-2013-fall-kickoff-symposium

How can instructors give prompt and effective feedback to enhance student learning?

At numerous points during a typical class instructors have the opportunity to give feedback to students about how well they did on assignments, papers, or exams, and how they might have done better. Students depend on such feedback to help them improve their future performance. This is why giving prompt feedback is listed as one of the seven "principles for good practice in undergraduate education" (Chickering and Gamson, 1987).

On Friday October 4th, the UW-Teaching Academy held its 2013 Fall Kickoff symposium on Enhancing student learning through feedback in Union South. Campus experts shared with about100 instructors from across discipline some research-based principles and experience-informed practices on how to provide effective feedback in diverse contexts.

Professor David Baum and Jamie Henke, Co-Organizers of this event and also Teaching Academy Executive Committee members, said the symposium was initiated in response to the sense that students do not always receive the prompt and helpful feedback that they need. Organized through UW-Teaching Academy, the aim of the symposium was to raise our teachers’ awareness of feedback as a high-impact practice in undergraduate education.

An introductory video showcased UW undergraduates’ opinions on feedback. Then, Erin McCloskey, Distance Education Professional Development Curriculum Director, followed up with a keynote on The importance of feedback in higher education and principles of quality feedback. She defined feedback as “actionable information about progress towards a goal to inform or direct future learning and performance” and provided guidance on what makes feedback and feedback practices effective.

Brad Hughes, Director of The Writing Center and Writing Across the Curriculum, gave another keynote on Questioning Assumptions: What Makes for Effective Feedback on Student Writing. Highlighting teaching as interaction, he mapped out some characteristics of effective feedback and gave advice on how to give holistic and summative feedback, and how to deploy appropriate rubrics. He aptly concluded that teachers’ genuine feedback is appreciated by students, though sometimes their appreciation may not be expressed till years afterwards.

After the keynotes, Janet Batzli from Biocore moderated four short talks given by Michelle Harris from Biocore and Katalin Dósa from Nelson Institute on Training TAs to give consistent and fair feedback, Beth Fahlberg from Nursing on Individualizing student feedback to promote learning, Jon McKenzie from English and DesignLab on Framing feedback for smart media projects, and John Booske from Electrical and Computer Engineering and WisCEL on Quality, quantity and diversity of feedback in WisCEL courses enhances relationships and improves learning. Their diverse insights included novel feedback strategies, introduction to practical feedback tools in Learn@UW, as well as personal stories on giving effective feedback to individual students.

The symposium ended with lunch discussions with the speakers. We would like to thank all our presenters for kindly staying through the whole morning and sharing their ideas with our participants. We hope that the conversations on giving prompt feedback starting at the symposium will continue and expand across this campus.

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Symposium Organizing Committee:  David Baum (Co-Organizer); Jamie Henke (Co-Organizer); Chris Lupton; Beth Martin; Erica Halverson; Michelle Harris; Debra Shapiro, Janet Batzli and Katalin Dosa.

The UW-Teaching Academy and the organizing committee gratefully acknowledge our co-sponsors: the Vice-Provost Office for Teaching and Learning, the DoIT Academic Technology, the Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program, and Office of the Secretary of the Faculty - New Faculty Services.

Notice to Academy Fellows about proposed amendments to by-laws

The Teaching Academy Executive Committee is giving official notice of intent to amend the by-laws of the Academy by 11 October 2013. All Fellows will have the opportunity to provide input and vote on the amendments. Please contact co-chair Adrian Treves (atreves@wisc.edu) with feedback at any point in the process. Thank you.

THANK YOU for service!


Dear Teaching Academy Colleagues,

On behalf of the UW-Madison Teaching Academy community, we would like to say THANK YOU to all of you who have participated in various roles noted in no particular order below in the 2012-2013 Academic Year and in the summer.

1. Presenting  at our 2012-2013 events: Chris Olsen (Fall Kickoff, Winter Retreat, Induction Ceremony and Summer Institute); James Wollack (fall kickoff); Chris Carlson-Dakes (Winter Retreat and TASI); David Baum (TASI); Greg Downey (TASI); Tess Arenas (TASI); Beth Martin (TASI); John Parrish (TASI); Thomas DuBois (TASI), Adrian Treves (TASI), and Erica Halverson (TASI).

2. Nominating new TA Fellows or Future Faculty Partners: Ruth Olson, Susan Nossal, James Blanchard, Michelle A. Harris, Cathy Middlecamp, Ralph Cagle, Norman Jensen, Beth Martin, Janet Batzli, Kimber Wilkerson.

3. Introducing new fellows at our 2013 Induction Ceremony: Chris Lupton (guest speaker), Janet Batzli, Erica Halverson, Beth Martin, Michelle Harris, Jakes Blanchard, Cathy Middlecamp, Ralph Cagle, Susan Nossal, Cathy Middelcamp, Adrian Treves, and Kimber Wilkerson.

4. Facilitating the 2013 Teaching and Learning Spring Symposium Lunch Discussions: Sarah Miller (Organizer), Margaret Nellis (Organizer), Mary McAvoy (Organizer), Melanie S. Jones, Christine Pfund, Kata Dosa, Michelle Harris, Chris Carlson-Dakes, Susan Wenker, Kevin Strang, Jamie Henke, Regina Dunst, Jill Hopke, Karen J. Kopacek, Sarah Decato, Holly Basta, KC Counter, Suzannah Sandrik, Janet Branchaw,  Erica Halverson, John Martin, Beth Meyerand, Cathy Middlecamp, Gregory A. Moses, Steven G. Oakes and Amy Smith.

5. Planning the 2012 Fall Kickoff: David Baum (Organizer), Michael Braum, Christine Lupton, Jamie Henke, Erica Halverson, Jeffrey Henriques, Tony Gregerson, Sarah Miller, Beth Martin and Janet Batzli.

6. Planning the 2012 Winter Retreat: Erica Halverson (Organizer), Beth Martin, Mary McAvoy, Sarah Miller, Janet Batzli, Amber Smith, and Sarah T. Kruger.

7. Planning the 2013 Summer Institute: Ruth Olson (Co-Organizer), Debra Shapiro (Co-Organizer), Sage Goellner, Christine Lupton, Christopher Carlson-Dakes, Melanie Jones, Debra Shapiro, John Parrish, John Martin, Sarah McDaniel, Dianna Wheeler and Andrea Teresa Arenas.

8. Serving on the TA Assessment Subcommittee chaired by David Baum: Janet Batzli, Beth Martin, Sarah Miller, Christine Lupton, Jamie Henke, Erica Halverson and Jeffrey Henriques.

9. Planning the 2013 Fall Kickoff Symposium: David Baum (Organizer), Christine Lupton, Jamie Henke, Erica Halverson, Jeffrey Henriques, Michelle Harris, Debra Shapiro, Sarah Miller, Beth Martin and Katalin Dosa.

10. Serving on the Teaching Academy Executive Committee: Janet Batzli (Co-Chair), Erica Halverson (Co-Chair), Beth Martin (Co-Chair), Cheryl Diermyer, Ruth Olson, Sarah Miller, David Baum, Jamie Henke, Peter Kuhn, Margaret Nellis, Adrian Treves and Debra Shapiro.

As we continue into this new academic year, we are hoping you will get involved in Teaching Academy activities and initiatives. Please contact us if you have ideas, or would like to discuss ways to help.

Beth Martin and Adrian Treves,

Co-Chairs

Teaching Academy 2013 Fall Kickoff - "Enhancing Student Learning through Feedback" on October 4

 

* Registration is closed.

At numerous points during a typical class instructors have the opportunity to give feedback to students about how well they did on assignments, papers, or exams, and how they might have done better. It is clear that students depend on such feedback to help them improve their future performance. This is why giving prompt feedback is listed as one of the seven "principles for good practice in undergraduate education" (Chickering and Gamson, 1987). As an instructor, how do you use feedback to help your students learn? How do we provide feedback that is useful to student learning, efficient for busy instructors, and timely? The 2013, Teaching Academy Fall Kickoff workshop, Enhancing student learning through feedback, will explore the principles and practice of enhancing student learning through frequent, timely, and effective feedback. The workshop will take place Oct. 4th 8am-1pm in Varsity Hall II, Union South. Please see below the tentative program

 

8:10-8:30         Coffee and Snacks

8:30-8:45         Welcome

Adrian Treves (Teaching Academy Co-Chair)

Chris Olsen (Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning)

 

8:45-9:15         Introduction to the Symposium and Video Presentation

David Baum (Botany) & Jamie Henke (Division of Continuing Studies)

 

9:15-10:00    Plenary Lecture: The importance of feedback in higher education and principles of quality feedback 

 

Erin McCloskey (Division of Continuing Studies)

Introduction and Facilitation by Jamie Henke

 

BREAK

 

10:15-11:00     Plenary Lecture: Questioning assumptions: what makes for effective feedback on student writing?

Brad Hughes (The Writing Center & Writing Across the Curriculum)

Introduction and Facilitation by Janet Batzli (Biocore & Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence)

 

11:00-12:00     Short Talks (Facilitation by Janet Batzli)

Michelle Harris (Biocore) and Katalin Dósa (Nelson Institute): Training TAs to give consistent and fair feedback

Beth Fahlberg (Nursing): Individualizing student feedback to promote learning

Jon McKenzie (English & DesignLab): Framing feedback for smart media projects

John Booske, (Electrical and Computer Engineering and WisCEL): Quality, quantity and diversity of feedback in WisCEL courses enhances relationships and improves learning

 

12:00-1:00       Lunch Discussions with the Speakers

Facilitation by David Baum (Botany)

1:00              Adjourn  

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Many Thanks to our Co-Sponsors: Vice-Provost Office for Teaching and Learning, Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program, DoIT Academic Technology, and Office of the Secretary of the Faculty - New Faculty Services.

Teaching Academy 2013 Summer Institute Press Release

On June 3-6, the UW-Teaching Academy held its 13th annual Summer Institute (TASI) at the UW Arboretum.  Our theme was “Teaching toEngage a New Generation of Learners.” Once again, the institute was an overwhelming success, with 45 participants from 22 departments across campus working on 21 different teaching projects. TASI participants enjoyed both time to work on their projects, and concurrent sessions such as designing writing assignments, evaluating writing, using rubrics, and addressing the achievement gap in their classrooms.  Dr. Markus Brauer talked about how to motivate students; Dr. Chris Olsen reviewed the Wisconsin Experience; and Dr. Erin McCloskey addressed the basics on online and blended learning.  Panels on Service Learning and "How to Make Students Think Hard" provided participants with ideas and models from outstanding instructors and programs.  TASI participants gave the institute high ratings and many left with new or revitalized courses. Most important, they left the institute eager to implement new ideas in the classroom and share ideas on teaching with colleagues. Additional details, some of the power-point presentation slides and participants’ shared experiences are accessible on the UW-Teaching and Learning Excellence webpage: https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/teaching-academy-summer-institute-2013

On behalf the UW-Teaching Academy and the organizing committee of this Summer Institute, we want to thank the Office of the Provost, DoIT Department of Academic Technology, UW-Madison Writing Center, the UW Libraries and the Delta Program for their financial and/or staff support during the whole week.

2013 UW Teaching Academy New Member Induction Ceremony on April 24th at Wisconsin Idea Room

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Teaching Academy is proud to announce the induction of 23 new members for 2013; 10 Fellows and 13 Future Faculty Partners (FFPs).  The induction ceremony is to be held on April 24th 2013 at 4:30 pm in the Education Building.

Teaching Academy Fellows and FFP's come from departments all across campus, and are admitted to the Academy based on their DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE IN teaching and on the recommendations from fellow faculty and students.

The new 2013 Teaching Academy Fellows include: Thomas A. DuBois, Scandinavian Studies; Cecelia Klingele, Law; Teresa (Teri) Larson, Chemistry; John Martin, DoIT and Counseling Psychology; Sarah McDaniel, the UW-Library; Seth McGee, Biology Core Curriculum; Steven George Oakes, Pharmacology; Suzannah Sandrik, Engineering Physics; Jeremy Smith, Medicine; and Hazel Symonette, Division of Student Life.

The new 2013 Teaching Academy Future Faculty Partners include: Dzhambul (Jambul) Akkaziev, History; Holly A. Basta, Institute for Molecular Virology and Biochemistry Department; Kara Bresnahan, Nutritional Sciences; Anne (Samuelson) Clarkson, School of Human Ecology; KC Councilor, Communication Arts; Sarah Decato, Chemistry; Brian C. Gibbs, Curriculum and Instruction; Rachel Gross, History; Emily Heying, Nutritional Sciences; Sara Lam, Curriculum and Instruction; Ilana Nankin, Curriculum and Instruction; Aaron B. T. Perzigian, Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education;  and William Tucker, Chemistry.

We also would also like to express our great gratitude to all the nominators of the new Fellows and FFPs: Ruth Olson, Susan Nossal, Charles T Lauhon, James Blanchard, Michelle A. Harris, Cathy Middlecamp, Ralph Cagle, Norman Jensen, Beth Martin, Janet Batzli, Brad Hughes, Sandra Arfa, Lucy Moore, Sherry A. Tanumihardjo, Guy E Groblewski,  Ann Palmenberg, Diana Hess,  Dave Riley, Sara L. McKinnon, Leslie Abadie, Travis Wright, Kimber Wilkerson, Alice Udvari-Solner and Nicholas Hill. 

 

REGISTER NOW: 2013 Teaching and Learning Symposium

Dear UW-Madison Campus Community,

Please join us for the 2013 Teaching and Learning Symposium, “Sparking Innovation: Ideas to Impact” on May 22 & 23, 2013 at Union South.

 

To view the program and register, please go to the newly designed website at:  <http://tlsymposium.wisc.edu>

Program Overview

 

Sparking Innovation: Ideas to Impact

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Union South

May 22-23, 2013

 

At UW-Madison, 2012-2013 has been named the Year of the Innovation, complementing the campus Educational Innovation (http://edinnovation.wisc.edueffort to enhance teaching and learning excellence and opportunities.  This year's Symposium will highlight some of these innovations.

 

Plenary sessions will bring together faculty, staff and academic leaders who are engaged in a variety of exciting efforts aimed at advancing teaching and learning and leading change in higher education.  Other sessions will highlight pedagogical and curricular innovations, provide new approaches to increase capacity and enhance diversity, build on research, provide practical strategies and tools to engage learners, and explore what teaching and learning will look like in the 21st century.

 

The symposium is an opportunity for all of us to share ideas and best practices, celebrate accomplishments, and discuss teaching and learning scholarship and practice in a forum dedicated to enriching the UW-Madison learning experience. 

 

Please join us for this exciting celebration of UW-Madison’s teaching and learning community!

For additional information, contact Sarah Miller, Planning Committee Co-Chair, at smiller8@wisc.edu.

 

Teaching Academy 2013 Summer Institute Call for Proposals (Deadline for Application: April 26th)

 

The Teaching Academy is pleased to announce the 13th Annual Summer Institute on Teaching and Learning, a four-day experience in faculty development and curriculum innovation.  This year’s Teaching Academy Summer Institute (TASI) will explore strategies for Teaching to Engage a new Generation of Learners  

The Institute, to be held June 3rd – 6th at the UW-Madison Arboretum, will offer faculty and instructional staff the opportunity to: 

• design a new course or redesign an existing one, either individually or collaboratively;
• meet and network with organizations (DOIT-AT, Libraries, etc.) across campus; 
• transform teaching (e.g. via technology, community building, and classroom innovation);  
• meet and interact with individuals across the campus passionate about teaching, and
• learn new tools and approaches that may enhance your classrooms.

Detailed application information is available at https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/summer-institute. Applications are due on Friday, April 26th, 2013 at 4:30 PM and acceptance letters will be sent out by May 15th. Early applications are strongly encouraged because space fills quickly. Applications should be submitted via email to Weili Zhao at teaching-academy@secfac.wisc.edu

For more information, contact the TASI 2013 co-chairs:

Ruth Olson (reolson3@wisc.edu) or Phone: 262-8180;

Debra Shapiro (dsshapiro@wisc.edu) or Phone: 262-9195.

The 2013 Teaching Academy Summer Institute is co-sponsored by UW-Teaching Academy, Office of the Provost, DoIT Department of Academic Technology, UW-Madison Writing Center, Library and Information Studies, and the Delta Program.

 

UW-Teaching Academy 2013 Call for Nominations

 

The UW-Madison Teaching Academy announces its annual Call for Nominations for faculty/staff Fellows or graduate/professional student or postdoctoral Future Faculty Partners.  Nominees should have (1) demonstrated teaching excellence and (2) a willingness to be active participants in Academy events and governance.  Fellows require a minimum of three years of teaching service at UW, whereas FFPs require three semesters of teaching experience (broadly construed) at UW.

Nominees should be committed to promoting excellence in teaching and to participating in the Teaching Academy. For more details and nomination packages, please visit https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/becoming-fellows  (for Fellows) or http://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/becoming-ffp  (for FFPs). The Induction Ceremony for new Fellows and Future Faculty Partners takes place in April 2013. Complete applications are due on Friday, March 22nd, 2013.

 

January 16th 2013: Teaching Academy Winter Retreat on "Review of Teaching for Learning"

Please note the location is moved to Union South, Varsity Hall II, due to a large number of registrants.

Campus conversation is building around improving teaching on campus, and the Teaching Academy invites you to be a part of the conversation!

Join us for our annual winter retreat:
 
2013 Teaching Academy Winter Retreat: Review of Teaching for Learning
Wednesday, January 16, 2013
8:30am - 12:00pm
Union South, Varsity Hall II
Keynote Presenters: Professor Richard Halverson (Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis) and Christopher Carlson-Dakes (Delta Program for Research, Teaching, and Learning; Faculty Associate in College of Engineering)
 
We will be joined by campus leaders who will provide opportunities to learn how to review teaching for multiple purposes -- especially to improve student learning. We will touch on review of teaching for tenure and promotion, how to construct peer groups for ongoing teaching improvement, and how to use data about student learning and behaviors to inform changes in your teaching. 
 
The retreat is open to the whole UW-Madison community, and we hope you'll be part of the conversation. Continental breakfast and coffee will be provided. More information will be posted soon. Space is limited to 80, so register soon!
 

Teaching Academy 2012 Fall Kickoff Symposium Press Release

Please note video clip and presentation slides are available here: https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/2012-fall-kickoff-symposium

 

                    What are the grades for and what should grades communicate?

Grading practice, as an essential element of effective teaching and learning, can be complicated and challenging to instructors. The UW-Teaching Academy 2012 kickoff symposium on Grading: from Philosophy to Practice initiated a campus wide conversation about how to evaluate our own grading practices on Friday, September 28th at Union South, Varsity Hall III. Over 100 participants from across campus showed up, shared thoughts, and left with a raised awareness of the importance and challenge of establishing rigorous and consistent grading practices.

Professor David Baum said the symposium was initiated in response to divergent views on grading expressed by faculty and instructional staff across campus and differences in the grading patterns seen in different schools and colleges. Organized through UW-Teaching Academy, the aim of the symposium was to explore the purposes of assigning final letter grades to students and to generate discussions over alternative practices and how they align with our broader goals. On Friday, this aim was well achieved.

An introductory short video set the stage by providing participants with a snapshot of attitudes to grading from current UW instructors and students. Professor James Wollack, from the Department of Educational Psychology and Office of Testing and Evaluation Services, followed up with a keynote on Grading: Principles and Practices. According to him, research shows that faculty teachers are assessment driven and they spend 30% of their planning/instructional time on assessment activities. But many of them do not have a clear understanding of the purpose of final course grades and what the grades should communicate. Professor Wollack claimed that although grades serve multiple purposes, their primary purpose should be to reflect the extent to which a student has mastered the essential learning outcomes.  He presented various specific practices that can help instructors better achieve that goal in a consistent and fair manner.

Jocelyn Milner, Director of Academic Planning and Institutional Research, talked about Grading Patterns and the Student Experience. She said that Institutional Research Perspective is mostly focused upon patterns in grading at a broad scale population level, rather than an individual level. Quantitative analysis of grades across campus show some dramatic differences in grading approaches taken by instructors and a need for better communication of grading policies and practices so as to achieve higher instructor-to-instructor consistency.

A Career Service Panel, organized by Wren Singer, Director of Undergraduate Advising, gave us a perspective on how grades are used post-graduation by potential employers and graduate programs. While grade point average, and to a lesser extent patterns of grades across a students education, may be important to employers, there is little attention to specific grades in specific courses.  But more important than grades are specific capabilities and skills that make the graduate a good potential employee: leadership, communication, participation in teamwork, and solving problems. This perspective helps instructors think how to advise students concerned about their grades and highlights the value in communicating clearly to students how a grade relates to qualities of concern to future employees, with the hope that students will then be better able to communicate their qualifications when applying for jobs.

The symposium ended with a series of concurrent hour-long facilitated lunch discussion where participants shared their reflections upon six topics: relationship between assessments of learning and grades, the future of course grades in higher education, grading group work, curving and other grade assignment strategies, and alternatives to multiple-chose exams in large classes.  We hope that the conversations on grading practices and policies starting at the symposium will continue and expand across this campus.

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Symposium Organizing Committee:  David Baum (Chair); Michael Braun; Tony Gregerson; Jamie Henke; Jeff Henriques; Chris Lupton; Beth Martin; Sarah Miller; Weili Zhao.

The UW-Teaching Academy and the organizing committee gratefully acknowledge our co-sponsors: the Vice-Provost Office for Teaching and Learning, the DoIT Academic Technology, the Madison Teaching and Learning Excellence Program, and Office of the Secretary of the Faculty - New Faculty Services.

 

2012 UW Teaching Academy New Member Induction Ceremony on April 25th at Union South

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Teaching Academy is proud to announce the induction of 26 new members for 2012; 16 Fellows and 10 Future Faculty Partners (FFPs).  The induction ceremony was held on April 25th 2012 at 4:30 pm in the Union South. 

Teaching Academy Fellows and FFP's come from departments all across campus, and are admitted to the Academy based on their DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE IN teaching and on the recommendations from fellow faculty and students.

The new 2012 Teaching Academy Fellows include: Craig A. Albers, Educational Psychology; Andrea-Teresa "Tess" Arenas, Office of Service Learning and Community Based Research; Stacey L Brickson, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation; Harry Brighouse, Philosophy; B. Bradford Brown, Educational Psychology; Duncan L. Carlsmith, Physics; Ralph Grunewald, Comparative Literature; Gregory A. Hollman, Pediatrics; Evelyn Howell, Landscape Architecture; Dipesh Navsaria, Pediatrics; Denise L. Walbrandt Pigarelli, Pharmacy; Catherine Voge, Nursing; Suzanna Waters Castillo, Division of Continuing Studies; Larry Watson, physics; Andrea L. Williams, Nursing; Scott T. Woody, Biochemistry.

The new 2012 Teaching Academy Future Faculty Partners include: Katalin Dósa, Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies; Erica J. Hagen, Geological Engineering; Jacqueline Hartley, Sociology; Gina M. Hedberg, Bacteriology; Melinda Kavanaugh, School of Social Work; Jennifer A Kowalkowski, Nursing; Sarah McArdell Moore, Counseling Psychology; Gina Spitz, Sociology; Melanie Spero, Bacteriology; Xin Zou, East Asian Languages and Literature/Curriculum and Instruction.

We also would also like to express our great gratitude to all the nominators of the new Fellows: Thomas R. Kratochwill, Sandy Magaña, Gary Diffee, Russ Shafer-Landau, Daniel Bolt, Peter Timbie, Mary N. Layoun, Marlowe Eldridge, Janet Batzli, Gwen McIntosh, Beth Martin, Paula Jarzemsky, Susan C Paddock, Susan Nossal, Nadine Nehls, Richard Amasino; and the nominators for the new FFPs: Jean Heitz, Dante O. Fratta and Craig H. Benson, Felix Elwert, John Mansfield, Stephanie A. Robert, Paula Jarzemsky, Carmen R. Valdez, Sarah Miller, Timothy Paustian and Wen-Hua Du.

Teaching Academy 2012 Summer Institute Call for Proposals

The Teaching Academy is pleased to announce the 12th Annual Summer Institute on Teaching and Learning, a four-day experience in faculty development and curriculum innovation. This year’s Teaching Academy Summer Institute (TASI) will explore strategies for Designing Relevant Learning. Our keynote speaker will be Emily Auerbach, an award-winning English Professor who serves as the Project Director of the UW Odyssey Project, a life-changing humanities course for low-income adults that serves as a foundation for continued education.

The Institute, to be held June 4th – 7th at the UW-Madison Arboretum, will offer faculty and instructional staff the opportunity to:
• design a new course or redesign an existing one, either individually or collaboratively;
• meet and network with organizations (DOIT-AT, Libraries, etc.) across campus;
• transform teaching (e.g. via technology, community building, and classroom innovation); 
• meet and interact with individuals across the campus passionate about teaching, and
• learn new tools and approaches that may enhance your classrooms.

Detailed application information is available at https://tle.wisc.edu/teaching-academy/summer-institute. Applications are due on Friday, April 27th, 2012 at 4:30 PM and acceptance letters will be sent out by May 15th. For more information, contact the TASI 2012 co-chairs:
Beth Martin (bamartin@pharmacy.wisc.edu) or Phone: 265-4667.
Ruth Olson (reolson3@wisc.edu) or Phone: 262-8180.

The 2012 Teaching Academy Summer Institute is co-sponsored by UW-Teaching Academy, Office of the Provost, DoIT Department of Academic Technology, UW-Madison Writing Center, Library and Information Studies, and the Delta Program.

Ten named winners of Distinguished Teaching Awards

Ten University of Wisconsin faculty members have been chosen to receive Distinguished Teaching Awards. This year’s recipients are: Nicholas J. Balster, associate professor of soil science, Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, and Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Chancellor’s Award; Jeffrey Beneker, associate professor of classics, Kiekhofer Award; Roseanne Clark, associate professor of psychiatry, School of Medicine and Public Health, Van Hise Outreach Award; Robert H. Fillingame, professor and chair, biomolecular chemistry, School of Medicine and Public Health, Chancellor’s Award; Parry Karp, professor of cello and chamber music and artist in residence, School of Music, Chancellor’s Award; Cameron Macdonald, assistant professor of sociology, Chancellor’s Award; Gary Shiu, professor of physics, Chancellor’s Award; M. Jake Vander Zanden, professor, Center for Limnology and Department of Zoology, Chancellor’s Award; Lee Palmer Wandel, professor of history, religious studies, and visual culture, Chancellor’s Award; and John Zumbrunnen, associate professor of political science, Chancellor’s Award.

Congratulations to our colleagues. You can read the complete details here.

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